Climate justice

Poland, 12 December 2018: Civil Society leaders from MVCs (Most Vulnerable Countries) and LDCs (Least Developed Countries) termed the negotiation outcome frustrating in a press conference held today in the CoP 24 Global Climate Negotiation in Poland. They demanded to finalize the Paris Rulebook as urgent action within this CoP-24. They also demanded to ensure first-start financing by developed countries that is in fact important for adaptation actions for MVCs and their survival.
The Press conference titled “MVC & LDC Peoples’ expectations and CoP 24” held at the meeting room of climate conference center, Poland where CSO leaders including Dr. Ainun Nishat (Delegate of Bangladesh govt. Negotiation Team), Mr. Soumya Datta (Member, Advisory committee of UNFCCC Climate Change Technology Center and Network-CTCN and Coordinator-Climate Action Network- South Asia, India), Mrs. Rushka Sthapit (Secretary-LDC Watch), Md. Shamsuddoha (CPRD, Bangladesh) and Mr. Manjeet Dakhal (LDC Negotiator) participated and spoke. The key demand is presented by Mr. Golam Rabbani (Research Fellow, Bangladesh Center for Advance Study) and Aminul Hoque (EquityBD) from Bangladesh.
Presenting of key demand, speakers said that the bleak ongoing performance and progress of CoP 24 negotiation is frustrating for us and there is no particular text of finalizing the Paris Rulebook, financial commitment with first-start financing and new Goal of Finance post 2020 period for implementation of MVC & LDCs adaptation actions. Favoring LDCs interest, they put four demands including i. Finalize the Paris Rule book as urgent action and within CoP-24, ii. Ensure first-start financing by developed countries for MVCs to start their most urgent adaptation actions, iii. Ensure easier access to GCF for MVCs Govt.-NGOs stakes and iv. WIM-Excom. (Executive Committee of Warsaw International Mechanism) report on displacement and loss & damage must be linking with GST (Global Stock Take) and Transparency Framework with separate financial mechanism.
Mr. Shamsuddoha said that making the rulebook on implementation of Paris Agreement is very much inadequate and itself flout due to overwhelming with huge divergences of views among Parties on many issues. CoP-24 leaders will have change their mindset, stop the vested role-playing and engage in the negotiation giving more and balanced focus of both MVCs interest. So that Paris Rule book to be developed based on the science limiting 1.5 degree warming, he opined.
Mr. Soumya Datta said if we want really a transformative changes, the finance is crucial. But the rich countries are playing a dirty game, because the US$100 billion dream is not coming anywhere yet and leveraging the private finance to make burden for MVC & LDCs in the name of climate finance. So it’s better to start repent the financing agreement and its process. The rulebook may talk a lot about reporting, verification and review, but these cannot be productive until it is owned by the rich countries and that finance is really needed to lowering global temperature.
Dr. Ainun Nishat said The IPCC Special Report on 1.5°C rise, the stakes of current ambition of GHGs reduction and said there is a “huge moral, ethical imperative” for leaders to “step up” for new ambition. So we reiterating that the stocktaking is an opportunity for rich and developed countries reconsideration the assessment and enhancing of GHGs reduction target and implementation of ambition in view of 1.5 degree temperature goal achieving.
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Today December 05 2018, in CoP 24 Global Climate Negotiation in Poland, Civil Society leaders from MVCs (Most Vulnerable Countries) and LDCs (Least Developed Countries) have meet a press conference in CoP-24 premises and demand for urgent action by developed countries to keep global warming to 1.5 degree temperature. They also demanded that the “Paris Rule Book” (Propose modalities to implement Paris Agreement) will contain MVCs interest addressing their vulnerability and survival strategies.
The Press conference titled “MVC & LDC’s Peoples’ expectations and CoP 24” held at the meeting room of climate conference center, Poland where representatives of different CSO leader like Dr. Ainun Nishat (Delegate of Bangladesh govt. Negotiation Team), Mr. Sanjay Vashist (Coordinator-Climate Action Network- South Asia, India), Mr. Hemantha Withanage (Executive Director-Center for Climate Justice, Sri Lanka), Mr. Atle Solberg (Head of Coordination-Platform of Disaster Displacement-PDD, Geneva) and Mrs. Lena Barenn (Coordinator-Norwegian Refugee Council-NRC, Geneva) are participated and spoke and the key demand is presented by Aminul Hoque (EquityBD) from Bangladesh.
Presenting of key demand, Aminul Hoque said that due to inaction of global leaders to climate change issues, global warming already reached more than 0.85 degree Celsius which worsening the climate scenario, that’s why the IPCC latest report made it clear; the world must come together now to take serious action to stop global warming. He says that MVCs are mostly affected. The impact deprives the most vulnerable groups from basic universal rights, particularly people living in coastal areas along with women and girls.
Sanjay Vashist said keeping to 1.50C, GHGs (Green Hose Gases) emissions would have to decline by about 45% between 2010 and 2030 and hit net zero in 2050. That’s significantly faster than what is needed for 20C a reduction of around 20% by 2030. We urged to developed countries to revise and enhance their NDCs as urgent action in reducing GHGs based on the IPPC 1.5 degree strategy. He also opined for ensuring long term finance for long term adaptation of MVCs.
Atle Solberg express deep concern on displacement that’s happening in MVCs due to climate change impacts. Developed countries have to recognize this issue and CoP-24 is opportunity to move this issue with effective manner. TFD (Task Force on Displacement) will submit recommendations to the parties but need to start their action to avoid risk of displacement.
Mr. Hemantha Withanage said that, we repeatedly remind the develop countries has an obligation to put adequate resource in to the climate financing. Report says that only 6.6 billion is available that insufficient, that’s why MVCs have to make big budget for disaster management which undermine real development for Health, Education etc. So developed countries should be accountable to appropriate finance at least climate issues and not push the ODA (Official Development Assistance) as climate finance.
Dr Ainun Nishat said CSO will have to raise their voice, because IPCC “1.5°C” report made many messages for developed countries, but it’s core is surely that developed countries will have to take lead keeping “the global temperature to well below 2°C” while “pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C” be an inspirational one and its possible.
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Dhaka, 13 November 2018. Today ten Civil Society Organizations (CSO) demanded an effective government role to ensure the interest of Most Vulnerable Countries (MVC) in upcoming CoP 24 (Conference of the Parties 24) global climate negotiation to be held in Poland. They also opined that Bangladesh should take strong position in CoP-24 for a legally binding commitment with high emission reduction target from developed countries and big polluters to achieve global warming below 2.0 degree Celsius. These demands are raised in the national seminar titled “CoP 24 Climate Conference: Expectation from CSOs in view of Implementing Paris Agreement” held at National Press Club, Dhaka.
Rezaul Karim Chowdhury of EquityBD moderated the seminar while keynote paper is presented by Syed Aminul Hoque from same organization. Dr. Quzi Kholiquzzaman, Chairman-PKF has chaired the meeting where Dr. Hasan Mahmud MP, Chairman of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF &CC) as chief guest and Dr. S. M. Munjurul Hanan Khan, Additional Secretary – MoEF&CC participated as special guest. Among other speakers Dr. Aynun Nishat-Professor Emeritus of BRAC University, Mr. Qumrul Islam Chowdhury of FEJB (federation of Environmental Journalist), Md. Pothar Hossen of BCJF (Bangladesh Climate Journalist Forum), Mr. Gerry Fox (Team Leader-PROKAS), Md. Ziaul Hoque Mukta from CSRL (Center for Sustainable Rural Livelihood), Md. Shamsuddoha of Chief Executive-PRDI spoke in the seminar.
In the keynote presentation Syed Aminul Hoque said that the CoP 24 conference is going to adopt “Paris Rule book” to implement the Paris Agreement which is very important to save country interest especially finance, technology and capacity building support. So our govt. delegation should strong position while setting modalities in Paris Rule book that ensure easier and effective access among these support mechanism.
Dr. Quzi Kholiquzzaman said that success of climate negotiation outcome will be threatened since the politics behind the scene is stronger than temperature goal. We, therefore, have to work with own capacity based on our resource.
Dr. Hasan Mahmud stressed on govt. position for the target of high emission reduction by big polluter countries as global temperature increasing and must rise up to more than three degree centigrade if all countries fulfill their commitment on reducing taregt. But we are frustrated observing the role of developed countries and their dubious role in implementing the PA. So CSO role is imperative like previous and raise voice together indeed
Dr. Aynun Nishat opine to take CSO recommendations before government position and should importance to hear CSO opinion. This is being slower somehow but need further strengthen. He also advice government to raise voice on the issues of Capacity building in upcoming CoP.
Dr. Munjurul Hanan Khan said that, Bangladesh has been playing a good role since the climate negotiations and there have well coordination between CSOs and govt. that is our strength. This CoP we also going to prepare our position and we will included our CSO opinion.
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Bali, 9th October 2018: As the signatory of Grand Bargain Principles (an UN led discourse of WHS) World Bank is urged to promote localization i.e. partnering with the local organizations in Cox’s Bazar, in the Rohingya refugee responses in Bangladesh.

Mr. Rezaul Karim Chowdhury, Executive Director of COAST Trust and Co-Chair of CCNF (Cox’s Bazar CSO-NGO Forum) made this urge in his speech during the session titled ‘Meet with EDs of World Bank’. He announces 3 concrete proposals for the World Bank for the Rohingya refugee response in Cox’s Bazar and those are:
1. To prepare a Rohingya pooled fund in view of GB commitment to promote local NGOs and Community who are leading the response.
2. To support GOB in view of UNHCR solidarity paper to support and assist the government of Bangladesh in macro-economic level, and
3. To consider support GOB for area development approach in Cox’s Bazar to promote economic, social and human development potentialities in the long run.

Mr. Hasan, Dean of EDs of World Bank, Ms. Aparna, ED responsible for Bangladesh were also present in the meeting that took place on 9th October 2018 in Bali, Indonesia.

In his speech, Mr. Rezaul Karim Chowdhury thanked the WB president Dr. Jim for announcing half a billion USD for Rohingya response. He also mentioned that we had an opportunity to meet Dr. Jim along with UNSG and hand over a memorandum in this relation.

Mr. Reza raised question in his speech that why WB should not prepare a plan for localization so that local NGOs / CSOs and local communities would lead a humanitarian and development efforts through a ‘Whole of Society Approach’ (WOSA) as WB is one of the signatories of GB (Grand Bargain). He stressed on reducing the fund management cost through a pragmatic reduction of the internationalized response approach.

Mr. Reza also said, the Government of Bangladesh deserves more macro-economic level solidarity support and Cox’s Bazar requires more area development support during the refugee response. Otherwise, this will create vulnerability in the long run for the local people as well as the national economy.

Dean of EDs Mr. Hasan said in response that partnering with local NGOs is a reality of political economy.

Ms Aparna the ED responsible for Bangladesh accepted the notion of Mr. Reza and said that partnering with local NGOs is a smart partnership.

While explaining the Grand Bargain, Mr. Reza said, WB is the distinguished signatory of GB commitments where there are 10 workstreams with 51 indicators. Important feature is stream 2 i.e. localization, that means giving the steering of humanitarian response to the local actors e.g. local government and local NGOs. It also means, the reduction of transaction cost through effective coordination and continuous striving, accountability to the local community and affected population, and finally, use of local knowledge and local resources. [Click here for video link]

Today 14 June 2018, nine civil society networking organizations on climate change coordinated by COAST Trust and EquityBD has organized a press conference at national press club and demand to give focus climate resilient Infrastructure development for climate Financing in upcoming national budget for 2018-19 fiscal year. They also criticize government for coating the traditional development budget as climate finance. They urged government to ensure adequate and additional new budget for climate resilient economy and building adaptive capacity of coastal people.

The press conference is moderated by M Rezaul Karim Chowdhury, Chief Moderator of EquityBD and key demand is read out by Syed Aminul Hoque of same organization. Among the others, Mr. Quamrul Islam Chowdhury, President-Federation Environment Journalist Forum Bangladesh, Motahar Hossain, Secretary-Climate Change Journalist Forum, Mrinal Kanti of Bangladesh Indigenous People Network on Climate Change and Badrul Alam of Bangladesh agriculture federation has spoken in the event favor of the demands.

Presenting the key demand, Syed Aminul Hoque said, this is good that government is preparing report on climate finance but observation showing on 2018-19 proposed budget for climate finance amount BDT 18,948 crore (8.82% of proposed budget) in fact color coating of climate finance on traditional development expenditure those done in previous. Following this observation, the group made four recommendation for 2018-19 new budget those are (i) Government must ensure new and additional budget as climate finance out of traditional allocation (ii) Separate between growth orient infrastructure and climate fighting infrastructure and will make allocation accordingly to save climate vulnerable people (iii) Expedite the preparation of NAP-National Adaptation Plan with mass participation and ensure budget for required adaptation finance, (iv) Ensure transparency and accountability of climate finance along with BCCTF-Bangladesh Climate Change Trust Fund.

Mr. Quamrul Islam said that the proposed climate finance is inadequate to fight climate change impact. Apart govt. suffering lack of capacity of her NIEs (National Implementing Entities) to influence the global climate financing process. He recommended to build up NIEs capacity to mobilize additional global finance that ease govt. to more support on climate finance.

Mr. Rezaul Karim opined, that government should follow her own climate change strategy plan, identify the climate hot spots for appropriate climate action and allocate budget accordingly through setting priority to develop specific climate resilient infrastructure.

Mr. Badrul Alam said that implementing climate finance activities under “Trust Fund” is questionable to mass as this has hardly impact in climate change arena. Even this year government didn’t allocate money for this fund which is a setback for implementing climate change action plans. He demand to engage the mass with the process, implementation and monitoring of trust fund. Motahar Hossain said cyclone SIDR and Aila has damaged major part of coastal embankments those we need to construct with new high to face tidal surge. Apart salinity is a new problem looming cause of mass displacement. Government should importance these issues and increase budgetary allocation.
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Today November 23 2017, Civil Society leaders have meet a press conference on post CoP 23 latest outcome and urged government to be prepared for next Facilitative Dialogue start in January 2018. They also recommended to present strong historical and current evidence-base context in receiving of global support on MVC’s Issues (Adaptation and Loss & Damage financing) in the discourse of political phase (participation of ministers of the parties) under this Facilitative Dialogue.
The Press conference titled “CoP 23 Outcome: Govt. Must be Prepared with strong evidence-base context for Next Facilitative Dialogue 2018 under CoP 24” held at Dhaka Reporters Unity where Dr. Atiq Rahaman of BCAS (Bangladesh Center for Advance Study), Mr. Quamrul Islam Chowdhury (Forum on Environmental Journalist, Bangladesh-FEJB) and Md. Motahar Hossen (Climate Journalist Forum-CJF) have participated and spoke. Mr. Rezaul Karim Chowdhury from EquityBD has moderate the press conference and briefing note on CoP outcome is presented by Aminul Hoque.
Briefing on the CoP outcome, Aminul Hoque said that CoP has made only successful progress especially to design the format and its principle of participation of upcoming Facilitative Dialogue 2018 that created scope for Bangladesh to present the story and build empathy & trust (Ref; CoP 23 official Deceleration, Annex II “Approach Talanoa Dialogue”). So our government should take this opportunities and present strong evidence-base on historical and current context to draw global attention and favor support in Financing and Technologies for MVCs survival through adaptation and resilient building.
Mr. Quamrul Islam Chowdhury said that CoP 23 in fact failure to reach with an appropriate framework for Loss and Damage and financing issues which is long standing issue for MVCs. The latest CoP decision in fact deferred the MVCs interest and expectations. However, we have to do intellectual work with this issue to show the capacity for access in finance and Loss & Damage.
Md. Motahar Hossen said that upcoming Facilitative Dialogue has structured with three generic topics for discourse those are i. Who are we? Ii. Where do we want to go? and iii. How do we get there? So government should prepare accordingly with evidence-base for next CoP, but doing this in prior, inclusive dialogue with different level stakeholder is must at national level developing country position.
Dr. Atiq Rahaman said that this is good to progress made in CoP 23 on agriculture and gender action but less progress in global issues like temperature goal. This is also good sign that Bangladesh has re-elected four working group in CoP. Next facilitative dialogue is a chance for BD to get effective result and further need to work intensively.
Rezaul Karim Chowdhury said that Bangladesh has been participating in CoP but less preparation officially. This has been observing since last couple of years where it’s difficult to assess country position and also difficult for CSOs to paly appropriate pro-government role in CoP. Less coordination between govt. delegation and Bangladeshi CSOs also now wider. So we urge to govt. to look on this issue giving very importance for next CoP-24. Apart govt. should ensure accountability of those are participating in CoP holding govt. delegation badge but didn’t play any contribution for govt.
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Today November 15 2017, in CoP 23 Global Climate Negotiation in Bonn, Civil Society leaders have meet a press conference and demanded for positive role from developed countries to make the Paris Agreement effective in post 2020 period lowering global temperature. The also demand to ensure pre and post 2020 financial support in paying their obligatory responsibility to survive of MVCs (Most Vulnerable Countries) through adaptation and resilient building.
The Press conference titled “MVC & LDC’s Peoples’ Interest and CoP 23” held at the meeting room 02 in Bonn climate conference center. Dr. Hasan Mahmud (Honorable MP and Chair parliamentary standing Committee on Ministry of Forest & Environment, Bangladesh), Dr Atiq Rahaman (Bangladesh Centre for Advance Study-BCAS), Md. Ziaul Hoque Mukta (Campaign for Sustainable Rural Livelihood-CSRL) from Bangladesh, Mr. Soumya Datta (Energy & Climate Group-India) and Hemantha Withanage (Centre for Environmental Justice) from Sri Lanka have participated. The key note is presented by Aminul Hoque (EquityBD) from Bangladesh.
Presenting of key demand, Aminul Hoque said that the bleak ongoing performance and progress on CoP 23 negotiation is frustrated for us and there have no particular interest especially on long term finance through public sources and ensuring technical support for MVC and LDCs (Least Developed Countries) those are most vulnerable. He condemned developed country Parties for submitting the LDCs draft conclusions to CoP without any discussion and negotiation. Refereeing the above concerns, he asked to develop country parties to play their positive role in achieving the Paris Agreement following the principle of CBDRRC “Common But Differentiate Responsibility and Respected Capacity”.
Mr. Soumya said that making the rulebook on implementing the Paris Agreement is very much inadequate and itself flout. If we want really a transformative changes, the finance is crucial. But the rich countries are playing a dirty game, because the US$100 billion dream is not coming anywhere yet and leveraging the private finance to make burden for MVC & LDCs in the name of climate finance. So it’s better to start repent the financing agreement and its process. The rulebook talks a lot about reporting, verification and review, but these cannot be productive until it owned by the rich countries that finance is really need to lowering global temperature.
Dr. Atiq Rahaman said climate impacts are growing in South Asian countries. In last six month of this year, Bangladesh has faced three consecutive natural disaster and experiencing huge loss and damage on agriculture and now become a food import country. Poor are paying the price and rich are not paying. In the clear evidence on climate impact, Paris Agreement is appeared a loose contract and the rulebook has tried to make effective and we hope that developed countries will do it must to save the earth and people as because leaders are there now.

Dr. Hasan Mahmud said that in fact we are not really satisfied on CoP outcome every year and even we are now struggling to Paris Agreement effective despite as a loose agreement indeed, but honestly said that the progress is not impressive. In case financing, GCF progress is frustrating and less than 10% of fund available for countries but access is very difficult for us those demand for adaptation. Climate induce displacement and migration issue is lost in the climate talk. So voice from the civil society is louder that must be heard by the global leaders and off course create an impact.
Hemantha said that Every time we come to the CoP with lot of hope but back to the home losing all our expectations. In this CoP, we are seeing the rich countries paying a very bad game. In case Loss & Damage financing USA, Australia and European Countries has been oppose many of these action and deferred to 2019. That’s why we worried to suffering with many climatic hazard in South Asian countries. So it needed to immediate decision on financial support under a dedicated financial mechanism for addressing loss and damage. We support Maldives representing AOSIS, calling for operationalizing the WIM so that it fulfills its original vision and delivers for people on the ground.
In moderating the press conference, Mr. Ziaul Haque Mukta said that developed countries has denied the pre 2020 ambition commitment (implementation of 2nd commitment of Kyoto Protocol) and in fact evaded their responsibility that is frustrating. We demand to polluters to reduce their emission immediately.
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Today November 08 2017, in CoP 23 Global Climate Negotiation in Bonn, CSOs (Civil Society Organizations), Development agencies, Rights Activist have meet a dialogue in CoP 23 side event programs and demand stronger action to ensure rights and dignity for climate induced displaced people and cross border migration. They also expect that the newly formed “Task Force for Displacement” will play their role to design appropriate framework to address the climate displacement issue.

The seminar has jointly organize by COAST Trust Bangladesh, OXFAM International and NRC (Norwegian Refugee Council) and held following the title “Uprooted by Climate change: Responding to the growing risk of displacement” at the meeting room 07 in Bon global climate conference, where CSOs, International & national level development agencies and rights activist form different countries have participated. The dialogue is moderated by Mr. Atle Solberg of PDD (Platform of Disaster Displacement) and OXFAM international has presented a briefing paper on climate displacement issues. Among others Mrs. Nina Birkeland (Advisor, NRC), Aminul Hoque from EquityBD and Jahangir Hossen Masum from CDP, Bangladesh spoke in the dialogue.

Presenting the briefing paper on Displacement, Mr. Simon said that, during the period of 2008-16 more than 24 million people displaced from lower income countries and 0.8 million from developed countries. This is happened due to changing the climate that increased devastative sudden onset event like hurricane in USA as well as slow onset events like sea level rise, drought in mostly south Asia and African countries. He made the example showing case of Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Kiribati and recommended for stronger action towards ending global climate pollution, supporting resilient communities, ensuring rights for people on the move, and developing long-term strategies to ensure those who are forced to move in future are able to do so safely and with dignity.

Mr. Aminul Hoque said that Bangladesh has been experiencing average 1.2 million internal displacement yearly and last six month in 2017, at least 0.8 million people have been displaced internally where around 10-15% of this displaced are unable to back their home due to damage the habitat permanently. Apart, increasing climatic impact fall our government in financial deficit in long term and undermine the capacity to enhance the necessary development program. So properly addressing the issue global cooperation needed with both humanitarian and financial support ensure.

Mrs Nina Birkeland (NRC) said that the newly formed Task Force on disaster displacement has mandate to develop an approach that minimize and address the displacement. Regarding the issue, Task Force will assess the knowledge on slow onset events, provide an overview on data source and develop a common methodology that will work properly.

Moderating the dialogue, Mr. Atle Solberg said that PDD has been working with government to ensure and protect the rights of climate displacement internally and cross border migration. Apart in 2018, negotiation will take place on finalizing the Global Compact on Refugee where we have to influence and peruse to the global discourse to address the climate displacement issue.

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November 07, 2017, in CoP 23 Global Climate Negotiation in Bonn, Civil Society leaders of South Asia have meet a press conference and demand to develop the Paris Agreement Rulebook through Inclusive, Participatory and Transparent process with Accountability Mechanism.
The Press conference titled “MVC & LDC’s Peoples’ Interest and CoP 23” held at the meeting room 02 in Bonn climate conference center where representatives of different CSO leader like Santosh Patnaik (Climate Action Network-South Asia) from India, Md. Jahangir Hossen Masum (Coastal Development Partnership) and Md. Ziaul Hoque Mukta (Center for Sustainable Rural Livelihood) from Bangladesh and Hemantha Withanage (Center for Environmental Justice) from Sri Lanka have participated and spoke. The key demand was presented by Aminul Hoque (EquityBD) from Bangladesh.
Presenting of key demand, Aminul Hoque said, due to inaction of global leaders to climate change issues, global warming already reached more than 0.85 degree Celsius which worsening the climate scenario, increasing global inequalities and impacts already distorting our livelihood economies in MVC & LDCs. So that the ongoing discourse on “Paris implementing rulebook” must ensure compliance with the Agreement lowering global warming. Developed countries must stepping to operationalization of the UNFCCC’s equity principles (Paris Agreement Clause 3), and the process of five-yearly global stock takes ensure effective driving to increased mitigation, adaptation and financial support for LDC & MVCs.
Md. Masum said, we are in fact worried about preparation of Rulebook and its process, because many development agencies and countries have been developing the rulebook targeting the Paris Agreement. So we urge that Paris Rulebook is for people not just a paper on mitigation, finance etc. and that’s why it would be develop through Inclusive, Participatory and Transparent process. Mr. Santosh Kumar said that, South Asian countries are in fore front of climate vulnerability and any impact has an effect to other countries. This is the real issue need to be address in a wider way in CoP negotiation that facilitate people to relocate with dignity.
Mr. Hemantha Withanage said that, it necessary to repeatedly remind the develop countries has an obligation to put adequate resource in to the climate financing. Report says that by 2020, US$ 50 billion and by 2030 will be needed more than 100 billion/yr. but this money is not coming and people suffering. That’s why country have to make big budget for disaster management which undermine real development. So developed countries should be accountable to appropriate finance at least climate issues, rather than own interest focus.
In moderating the press conference, Mr. Ziaul Haque Mukta said that though we have reached the Paris Agreement but not satisfied on the outcome. However hope to see the rulebook will work for poor and vulnerable people and their survival.

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Dhaka, 30 October 2017. Today eleven Civil Society Organizations (CSO) has demanded transparent and coordinative government role from government delegation in Bonn climate conference and to take positon for easy access from GCF (Green Climate Fund) as Most Vulnerable Country (MVC). They made this demand in national seminar title “CoP 23 Bonn Climate Conference: Expectation from CSOs in view of Implementing Paris Agreement” that held at National Press Club, Dhaka. They seminar were jointly organized by BAPA, BIPNetCCBD, BCJF, CSRL, CDP, CPRD, Brac University, BCAS, ICCCAD, COAST and EquityBD.

The seminar was moderated by Rezaul Karim Chowdhury of EquityBD and key note presented by Syed Aminul Hoque from same organization. Dr. Qazi Kholikuzzaman, Chairman-PKF and official Coordinator of Bangladesh Government Climate Negotiation Team has chaired the seminar. Dr. Hasan Mahmud MP, Chairman, Parliamentary Standing Committee on Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoE&F) has participated as chief guest. Among other speaker Dr. Atiq Rahman of BCAS,  Md. Raseduzzaman, Director,  Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA), Mr. Qumrul Islam Chowdhury of FEJB (Forum of Environmental Journalist in Bangladesh), Mr. Tanvir Mahmud from British Council, Mr. Prodip K Roy from CSRL (Center for Sustainable Rural Livelihood) spoke in the seminar.

In the key note presentation Aminul Hoque said that Bangladesh frequently suffer of climate change impact but getting very less support from the developed countries and different multilateral fund that what they have pledged in different climate conferences. He made four key demands (i) Developed countries must increase their ambition target based on science toward reducing global warming, (ii) Ensure easier access to GCF for most vulnerable countries without any condition of co-financing, (iii) Include new text on “Country goal on Adaptation” instead of so called global goal of adaptation and (iv) Include climate migration issues in the process of Loss & Damage work stream.

Dr. Qazi Kholikuzzaman said that GCF has been changing their rule & process frequently bypassing their funding principle which is problem for MVCs. Now access to GCF is very complicated and we off course take position on this issue in CoP 23. He also said that Bangladesh has position especially will give stress to implement the commitment those given by developed countries through Paris Agreement (PA).

Dr. Atiq Rahaman said that we have been suffering and paying most despite have no responsibility for changing our climate. PA is become a loose agreement as there CBDR policy (Common but Differentiate Responsibility) has not included. He urged for our interest, govt. should develop special ministry of climate change who will continue the chronology of global negotiation and get expected output over time.

Dr. Hasan Mahmud said that global temperature may go  up to more than three degree centigrade if the present INDC (Intended Nationally Determined Contribution), which is in fact not at all sufficient to save mother earth. He urged developed countries must raise their ambition in respect of mitigation. He urged global CSOs to raise voice in this regard.
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